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Renditioner compatible with sketchup 2014 available in the general discussion thread - SKETCHUP 2014.

problems with lighting, need tips!
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* July 10, 2011, 01:26:26 PM
Hi,
I have spent lots of time today trying to solve my problem.

What I am trying to achieve: good lighting on the top view of my model (refer to the attachement called lights3).  The carpet is way too dark, it is supposed to be off-white
What I have tried yet: to add multiple "stars" which all have a point light to each of their own axis (refer to images lights and lights2)  The Lumen is 50 000 each, which should be more than enough to light my carpet correctly!

You can also see my lighting setting here. ???

Do you have any recommendation?  I have also tried to add multiple spotlights but it does not light my carpet better.

Thank you so much in advance,

Caroline

[attachment deleted by admin]

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* July 11, 2011, 12:26:29 AM
#1
Try to use the "Cloudy" natural lighting condition and move the slider of Elevation to the end of High.
Set the natural lighting slider two ticks to dim.
Next, decrease the intensity to approx. 500 lumen (try multiple renders to get it right)

Now you should see the contrast of the render decreasing.

Play with the settings to get best results.

Hope this helps

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Tony van Loon
Civil Engineer & 3d Artist


* July 11, 2011, 07:38:30 AM
#2
Caroline, It appears to me that your image is lighting properly, maybe not as you want it to, but from a engineering point of view it may be fairly accurate. You should read the tutorial on lighting to begin with, and do some experiments with a simple model using from 1 to 4 fixtures just to get the feel for what can be done. Vary the lumen, cone angle, and heights and see what happens. The time spent playing with a simple model, is often much less then a single render of a complicated model. Btw, with as many fixtures as you have, 50,000 lumen is a lot of light. Unless your ceiling is very high, with the number of fixtures you have for a living room setting, I would use between 50 and 500. My guess would be closer to 50 then 500, but you have to experiment.

White is a difficult color for a beginner to master. I also see that you are mixing natural and artificial light together. This can cause problems with shadows. Each light will cast a shadow, so you will get multiple shadows from each chair, etc.  Make sure that you do not have any SU default textures, its best to apply a color to every face. Also upgrading to v2 will make life much easier.

What is a "star" fixture and where did you get it?
« Last Edit: July 11, 2011, 07:46:36 AM by honoluludesktop »

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* July 11, 2011, 07:40:21 AM
#3
Hi Tony,
Thanks for the tips.
I am afraid it is not that easy... I have tried so many combinations and here is the new result according to your advise.  You can also refer to the settings attached.

If you have any other idea, please let me know!  I am really hoping to find a solution...

Thank you again,

Kind regards,

Caroline

[attachment deleted by admin]

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* July 11, 2011, 07:45:18 AM
#4
Honolulu,

Thank you for your reply (again!)

Something I do not master well at all, is orienting a cone light to the right target and from the right origin, without having to play randomly.  I have red many posts about that, but I really don't understand the explanations.  I am trying to find a tutorial video about that, but can't find one.  If you have any link, please let me know.

I want to learn!

Thank you again,

Caroline

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* July 11, 2011, 07:51:34 AM
#5
Hey.. I edited my post while you were responding, take another look at it. I don't have access to v1, but from SketchUp help, can't you get IDX help?

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* July 11, 2011, 07:57:27 AM
#6
Here are a couple of links. They are at the bottom of the Tips and Tricks page. http://forums.idx-design.com/index.php?topic=80.0 and http://forums.idx-design.com/index.php?topic=48.0

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* July 15, 2011, 02:26:17 AM
#7
Hi Caroline,

What happens if you turn off the invisible lights and only use the natural light?

Step 2 would be placing some low power invisible lights in the rooms itself.

Hope this works

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Tony van Loon
Civil Engineer & 3d Artist